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Bee Swarm

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Bee Swarm Relocation Service

I do remove honey bee swarms and relocate them for a cost, others may do it for free but I have to charge for my services. All honey bees are removed alive and put into a hive. Swarming is the process by which a new honey bee colony is formed when the queen bee leaves the colony with a large group of worker bees. In the prime swarm, about 60% of the worker bees leave the original hive location with the old queen. This swarm can contain thousands to tens of thousands of bees. Swarming is mainly a spring phenomenon, usually within a two- or three-week period depending on the locale, but occasional swarms can happen throughout the producing season. Secondary afterswarms may happen but are rare. Afterswarms are usually smaller and are accompanied by one or more virgin queens. Sometimes a beehive will swarm in succession until it is almost totally depleted of workers.

About Bees Swarming and Why ?

Swarming is the process by which a new honey bee colony is formed when the queen bee leaves the colony with a large group of worker bees. In the prime swarm, about 60% of the worker bees leave the original hive location with the old queen. This swarm can contain thousands to tens of thousands of bees. Swarming is mainly a spring phenomenon, usually within a two- or three-week period depending on the locale, but occasional swarms can happen throughout the producing season. Secondary afterswarms may happen but are rare. Afterswarms are usually smaller and are accompanied by one or more virgin queens. Sometimes a beehive will swarm in succession until it is almost totally depleted of workers.

Swarm Preparation

Worker bees create queen cups throughout the year. When the hive gets ready to swarm the queen lays eggs into the queen cups. New queens are raised and the hive may swarm as soon as the queen cells are capped and before the new virgin queens emerge from their queen cells. A laying queen is too heavy to fly long distances. Therefore, the workers will stop feeding her before the anticipated swarm date and the queen will stop laying eggs. Swarming creates an interruption in the brood cycle of the original colony. During the swarm preparation, scout bees will simply find a nearby location for the swarm to cluster. When a honey bee swarm emerges from a hive they do not fly far at first. They may gather in a tree or on a branch only a few feet from the hive. There, they cluster about the queen and send 20 - 50 scout bees out to find suitable new nest locations. This intermediate stop is not for permanent habitation and they will normally leave within a few hours to a suitable location. It is from this temporary location that the cluster will determine the final nest site based on the level of excitement of the dances of the scout bees. It is unusual if a swarm clusters for more than three days at an intermediate stop.

Swarming creates a vulnerable time in the life of honey bees. Cast swarms are provisioned only with the nectar or honey they carry in their stomachs. A swarm will starve if it does not quickly find a home and more nectar stores. This happens most often with early swarms that are cast on a warm day that is followed by cold or rainy weather in spring. The remnant colony after having cast one or more swarms is usually well provisioned with food, but the new queen can be lost or eaten by predators during her mating flight, or poor weather can prevent her mating flight. In this case the hive has no further young brood to raise additional queens, and it will not survive. An afterswarm will usually contain a young virgin queen.

 


Call or text Nick Risa at 708-218-0535.

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Providing nuisance animal trapping and removal services in the greater Chicago, Illinois (IL) region, including the cities of Joliet, Naperville, Lockport Illinois, Mokena, Bolingbrook, Cicero, Crete, Des Plaines, Evanston, Summit, Homer Glen, Mount Prospect, Oak Lawn, Oak Park, Orland Park, Palatine, Elwood, Crestwood, Oak Forest, and more. I service all of Cook County and Will County Illinois Wildlife calls, including the cities and villages of Downtown Chicago, Berwyn, Blue Island, Burbank, Beverly, Calumet City, Chicago Heights, Country Club Hills, Countryside, Des Plaines, Harvey, Hickory Hills, Hometown, Markham, Woodridge, Oak Forest, Palos Heights, Palos Hills, Park Ridge, Prospect Heights, Burr Ridge, Town of Cicero, Villages of Alsip, New Lenox, Barrington, Barrington Hills, Bedford Park, Bellwood, Bensenville, Berkeley, Bridgeview, Plainfield Broadview, Steger, Brookfield, Buffalo Grove, Burnham, Burr Ridge, Calumet Park, Chicago Ridge, Crestwood, Deer Park, Deerfield, Dixmoor, Dolton, East Dundee, East Hazel Crest, Evergreen Park, Flossmoor, Ford Heights, Forest Park, Forest View, Frankfort Illinois, Frankfort Square, Green Gardens, Franklin Park, Glencoe, Glenview, Glenwood, Golf, Hanover Park, Harwood Heights, Hazel Crest, Hillside, Hinsdale, Hodgkins, Aurora, Hoffman Estates, Homewood, Indian Head Park, Matteson, Justice, Kenilworth, La Grange, La Grange Park, Lansing, Lemont, Lincolnwood, Lynwood, Lyons, Maywood, McCook, Merrionette Park, Midlothian, Morton Grove, Mount Prospect, Niles, Norridge, North Riverside, Northbrook, Northfield, Oak Brook, Oak Lawn, Oak Park, Olympia Fields, Orland Hills, Orland Park, Palatine, Palos Park, Park Forest, Posen, Richton Park, River Forest, River Grove, Riverdale, Riverside, Robbins, Roselle, Rosemont, Sauk Village, Schaumburg, Schiller Park, Skokie, South Barrington, South Chicago Heights, South Holland, Steger, Stickney, Stone Park, Streamwood, Summit, Thornton, Tinley Park, University Park, Western Springs, Wheeling, Willow Springs, Woodridge, Worth, and more.

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